The Deadly Gun

I’ve been away.

That’s my excuse for not posting in a while. I was in Wellington and this blog is located in Auckland.

If you buy that excuse, then, well, I’ve got an old cannon from North Head to sell you.

This one.

The story of this particular cannon is interesting because it is the only gun from North Head ever involved in a fatality, and that fatality is the reason why it was moved from the traffic island on Broadway; a drunk driver careened into it and a fast car hitting an rather inflexible, solid iron, cannon, and this means death1.

So, the death cannon, as I like to call it, lies hidden away where no one case see it. I hope Garth McVicar has been told; we can’t just have these death cannons on display for all the public to see and be threatened by them. Lock up the cannon, I say.

Or move it back to North Head.

These are the only two options2.

Message ends.

Notes

  1. Of course, it doesn’t really mean “Death” at all, although it might signify it or some po-mo claptrappy thing like that.
  2. Of course, they aren’t the only two options really.

About Matthew Dentith

Author of "The Philosophy of Conspiracy Theories" (Palgrave Macmillan), Matthew Dentith wrote his PhD on epistemic issues surrounding belief in conspiracy theories. He is a frequent media commentator on the weird and the wonderful, both locally and internationally. On occasion he can be caught dreaming about wax lions but, mostly, it is rumoured he works for elements of the New World Order.