#edchatnz – A student teacher’s perspective cc: @HelenHaine @Mfknott @CKinNZ

How did you attend the #Edchatnz Conference? (Face 2 Face, followed online or didn’t)?

Face to face both days.

How many others attended from your school or organisation?

Seven! Seven grad dip students from Massey University’s Primary Teaching course.

How many #Edchatnz challenges did you complete?

One, which was the obligatory greflie with Maurie Abraham.

Who are 3 people that you connected with and what did you learn from them?

I’m really not sure how to answer that one. I spent a lot of time with my fellow classmates and a fair bit of time chatting with a lot of interesting and friendly people, but to select just three and make them out as being particularly special for my learning over those two days seems a bit unfair. I must say that helping three of my fellow students, who are new to Twitter and didn’t know the difference between a hashtag and a mention, was really educational. Often we think the technologies we use are immediately user-friendly. Seeing people take their first steps with it, though, is eye-opening.

What session are you gutted that you missed?

I’m just going to quote Paula Hogg’s response to this one, since a) she tagged me and got me into this mess in the first place and b) I was going to say nearly the same thing anyway.

Pam Hook’s SOLO workshop. I have glanced over the work and am keen to know more.

Who is one person that you would like to have taken to Edchatnz and what key thing would they have learned?

Dr. Roberta Hunter, the programme co-ordinator for the Massey Albany Grad Dip Primary (Teaching) students. There was a lack of teacher trainers at #edchatnz and, frankly, I think that’s a shame. Also, I think Bobbie needs to see just how important it is to get some technology instruction and material on modern learning environments into the Grad Dip ASAP.

Is there a person you didn’t get to meet/chat with (F2F/online) that you wished you had? Why?

I would have liked to have had a chance for a longer chat with Claire Amos (ClaireAmosNZ). We only managed to have a short “‘You’re awesome.’ ‘No, you’re awesome.'” moment after the debate.

What is the next book you are going to read and why?

“You’ve got to be kidding: How jokes can make you think” by John Capps and Donald Capps. Mostly because it’s been sitting beside my bed for a year, waiting to get to the top of the pile.

What is one thing you plan to do to continue the Education Revolution you learnt about at #EdchatNZ?

Mind control chips. For parents, obviously.

Seriously, though: just keeping up with what other people are doing rather than siloing. #edchatnz is a good way to practice that mantra, although given the number of assignments I have to complete at the moment it’s hard going even opening Twitter some nights.

Will you take a risk and hand your students a blank canvas?

I’m about to start my third pract, so, yes. Hopefully it’s part of a lesson plan, though, rather than me just making stuff up on the spot.

Tagged:

@HelenHaine

@Mfknott

@CKinNZ


About Matthew Dentith

Author of "The Philosophy of Conspiracy Theories" (Palgrave Macmillan), Matthew Dentith wrote his PhD on epistemic issues surrounding belief in conspiracy theories. He is a frequent media commentator on the weird and the wonderful, both locally and internationally. On occasion he can be caught dreaming about wax lions but, mostly, it is rumoured he works for elements of the New World Order.